Health Living

According to a study, vitamin K1 can reduce the risk of bone fractures in elderly people.

Higher vitamin K1 intake is linked to a decreased incidence of long-term fracture-related hospitalization, according to an Australian study.

Sydney, Australia | BAZZUP | Higher vitamin K1 intake is linked to a decreased incidence of long-term fracture-related hospitalization, according to an Australian study.

Nearly 1,400 older Australian women were studied over a 14.5-year period by researchers from Edith Cowan University (ECU) and the University of Western Australia to examine the connection between fracture-related hospitalizations and vitamin K1 intake.

According to the research, which was written up in the Food & Function journal, women who consumed more than 100 mcg of vitamin K1 per day—roughly 125 g of dark leafy vegetables—had a 31% lower risk of suffering any fractures than those who consumed less than 60 mcg.

More encouraging findings were made regarding hip fractures, with those who consumed the most vitamin K1 seeing a nearly 50% reduction in the likelihood of being admitted to the hospital.

Marc Sim, the primary author and senior research fellow at ECU, said in a statement that he saw the findings as more support for the advantages of vitamin K1, which has also been demonstrated to improve cardiovascular health.

Basic research on vitamin K1 has revealed that it plays a crucial part in the carboxylation of vitamin K1-dependent bone proteins like osteocalcin, which is thought to increase bone toughness, according to the specialist.

He added that vitamin K1 may also improve bone health by inhibiting various bone resorbing agents, noting that dietary vitamin K1 intakes of less than 100 mcg per day may be too low for this carboxylation.

The statement lists kale, spinach, broccoli, green beans, prunes, kiwi, and avocado as foods high in vitamin K1.

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