Discovery

Untold Stories: The Devil’s Sea (The Dragon’s Triangle) & Mystery Waters

The Devil's Sea also known as the Dragon's Triangle, the Formosa Triangle and the Pacific Bermuda Triangle, is a region of the Pacific, south of Tokyo.

There are tons of mysterious places around the world both on land and in the water – that are difficult to explain logically. The legends of missing vessels and ghost ships drifting without its crew in these locations have made them synonyms to the mystery. Though the notorious Bermuda triangle tops the list of most mysterious places on this planet, a number of other locations also remain mysterious as much as the former. The Devil’s Sea, also known as the Dragon’s Triangle, is one of such sailors’ nightmares in the waters around the world.

Located near to the Japanese coast in the Pacific Ocean, the Devil’s Sea (Ma-no Umi in Japanese) is one of the twelve Vile Vortices located around the earth. Vile vortices are those areas where the pull of the planet’s electromagnetic waves is stronger than anywhere else. As the title indicates, the Dragon’s Triangle extends as a triangle between Japan and the Islands of Bonin, including a major portion of the Philippine Sea.

There are tons of mysterious places around the world both on land and in the water – that are difficult to explain logically. The legends of missing vessels and ghost ships drifting without its crew in these locations have made them synonyms to the mystery. Though the notorious Bermuda triangle tops the list of most mysterious places on this planet, a number of other locations also remain mysterious as much as the former. The Devil’s Sea, also known as the Dragon’s Triangle, is one of such sailors’ nightmares in the waters around the world.

Located near to the Japanese coast in the Pacific Ocean, the Devil’s Sea (Ma-no Umi in Japanese) is one of the twelve Vile Vortices located around the earth. Vile vortices are those areas where the pull of the planet’s electromagnetic waves is stronger than anywhere else. As the title indicates, the Dragon’s Triangle extends as a triangle between Japan and the Islands of Bonin, including a major portion of the Philippine Sea.

The area has also been called as the Pacific Bermuda Triangle, denoting its position that is precisely opposite to the Bermuda Triangle and the similarities in the “paranormal phenomena” of the area with that of the Bermuda Triangle. Such an infamous reputation for this oceanic area has been not gained contemporarily, but exists for decades and even centuries, if some records are to be believed. The area has been in news since several decades for unexplained incidences of vanishing of ships. According to the legends, the waters of the triangle are notorious for making even the strongest vessels disappear, along with the crew abroad.

Notable Events in the Devil’s Sea

It is said that the conqueror Kublai Khan, the fifth Great Khan of the Mongol Empire and the grandson of Genghis Khan, had tried to make inroads into Japan in 1274 and 1281 AD. However, on both attempts, he failed to invade the country after losing his vessels and 40,000 crew members abroad in this triangular area, reportedly due to typhoons.

As Kublai Khan and his army abandoned the plan to invade Japan, the Japanese believed that it’s the God who sent the typhoons to save them from the enemies. Later, strengthening the truth behind the legend, the divers and marine archaeologists have found the remaining of the Mongol fleets from the region.

Another story doing the rounds tells the sighting of a mysterious lady sailing a vessel in the Devil’s sea in the early 1800s. It is said that the vessel resembled the traditional Japanese equipment for burning incense. However, the destination and identity of the vessel still remain as a mystery.

In the later century, especially in the 1940s and 1950s, a number of fishing vessels and over five military vessels were disappeared in the sea, in an area that lies between Miyake Island and Iwo Jima. As a result, Japan sent research ship named Kaio Maru No.5 in 1952 to investigate about the previously missing vessels that had been reported to have gone missing in the Dragon’s Triangle without any trace. However, the research vessels with 31 crew members abroad also met the destiny of previous vessels which went to the Devil’s sea. The wreck of the Kaio Maru No.5 was recovered later, but the whereabouts of the crew members were never heard of again. Following this incident, the Japanese government reportedly declared this area dangerous for marine voyaging and transporting goods. Moreover, as a result of this unprecedented incident, all efforts to unearth the facts behind the mystery were also aborted completely.

Origin of the Devil’s Sea Extrasensory Myth

To begin with, the term dragon in the Devil Sea’s name originates from the Chinese fable about dragons existing below the water surface. According to these fables, the dragons under the sea attack vessels passing by to satiate their hunger. These fables have originated well before the AD period – 1000 BC era. With their emphasis on the presence of mythical creatures like dragons, these fables have made a huge impact in the legends and mysterious stories created in the years to come.

Similarly, the Japanese name “Ma-No Umi,” means the Sea of the Devil, was originally coined by the Japanese countrymen years ago when the stories of paranormal phenomena in the sea was popularised.The superstitions associated with the Devil’s Sea always haunted the Japanese from venturing into this part of the ocean right from centuries past.

Other Explanations for the mystery of Devil’s Sea

As the myths of the Devil’s Sea popularized through legends, there were also hypotheses, including the scientific explanations, attempting to solve the mystery. Several efforts were also made to understand the truth behind the so-called paranormal phenomenon.

Scholars like Ivan Sanderson have suggested that it is the hot and cold currents crossing this Vile Vortice leading to the disappearance of vessels in the Devil’s Sea. According to him, these currents result in electromagnetic disturbances that trap the ships passing by.

Another hypothesis suggested that it is the subsea volcanoes in the area caused the disappearance of vessels. The eruptions from these volcanoes could have initiated such accidents, substantiating the stories of dragons sucking in ships and its crew to the ocean’s depths. Due to the undersea volcanoes and seismic activities, according to marine scholars, the islands in the area often disappear suddenly, while new ones appear at the same pace.

Another scientific research claimed that the anomalies believed to occur in the triangle were the result of an environmental phenomenon. The researchers argued that the area has the presence of methane hydrates on the seabed. When methane hydrates gas or methane clathrates explodes, bubbles will be formed on the water surface as the ice-like deposits separate from the bottom of the ocean at the time of the explosion. These activities can interrupt buoyancy and also destroy a vessel without even leaving a trace.

However, in 1989, American writer and paranormal activity theorist Charles Berlitz wrote a book, The Dragon’s Triangle, after detailed research on the paranormal activities in the Devil’s Sea. According to him, the accidents involving five Japanese military vessels in the triangle, due to the ‘evil’ nature of the sea, have resulted in the death of more than 700m people.

Later, questioning Charles arguments that substantiating the Devil’s Sea is a mythical area abound with paranormal activities; Larry Kusche published a book titled The Bermuda Triangle Mystery Solved in the year 1995. In his work, Kusche rejected the story of the disappearance of Japanese war-ships, arguing that the vessels went missing were fishing boats.

In his book, Kusche has also claimed that the research ship sent by the Japanese contained a crew of only 31 people as opposed to the 100 stated by Charles and the vessel was wrecked instead of disappearing completely. He argued that the research vessel was wrecked by an undersea volcano in September 1952. The remains of the wreckage were retrieved by the Japanese a few years ago which further rejected Charles’s claims.

The Pacific Bermuda Triangle might be subjected to numerous theories and suppositions. But in spite of scientific evidence and the mythical aura surrounding the oceanic arena, it’s continued mysterious existence is a testimony that certain phenomena in the world are far beyond the control of human beings.


Mysterious waters from the Bermuda Triangle to the Devil’s Sea

Tales of missing maritime vessels and rumors of drifting, crewless ships have long colored the popular imagination when it comes to legends of the high seas.

Certain locations have become synonymous with unexplained disappearances and for intrepid sailors with a taste for the paranormal, these places can hold a spookily magnetic appeal.

So if you fancy a sailing holiday with a supernatural slant, you’ll need to know where the fiction ends and the facts begin. To help you along your way we delve deep into some of the world’s most mysterious waters.

Bermuda Triangle

The vast triangular area of ocean with imaginary points in Bermuda, Florida and Puerto Rico — popularly known as the “Bermuda Triangle” — has long been associated with mysterious disappearances, paranormal activity and even fissures in the fabric of space itself.

Interest in the region began after a group of military planes carrying 14 men inexplicably vanished somewhere off the coast of southern Florida in December 1945.

Before losing radio contact, it’s claimed the flight leader was heard saying: “We are entering white water, nothing seems right.”

Almost immediately afterwards, a further 13 crew-members — dispatched as a flying search party — themselves vanished. Neither group’s remains were ever discovered and the Bermuda Triangle legend was born.

Numerous further disappearances, including a large oil tanker, a pleasure yacht and a small passenger plane were attributed to the area’s paranormal forces.

A raft of books, like “The Devil’s Triangle,” “Limbo of the Lost,” and “The Riddle of the Bermuda Triangle” all contained supernatural explanations — from UFOs to “wormholes” to technology left over from the mythical lost continent of Atlantis.

However, in later years, skeptics have argued that the number of ships and aircraft reported missing in the area is, statistically, no more significant than in any other part of the ocean.

Indeed, the area is today one of the most heavily traveled shipping lanes in the world, and most appear to get by without so much as dipping oar into another dimension.

Sargasso Sea

Next door to the Bermuda Triangle, and stretching far out into the Atlantic Ocean, is the eerily calm Sargasso Sea.

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Despite sitting in the middle of the otherwise freezing Atlantic, the water in the Sargasso is warm and embroidered with sargassum — the dense seaweed from which it gets its name.

The area has an intriguing reputation for robbing sail boats of their crew, leaving nothing but empty, wandering vessels.

Among its victims was the tall-mast ship “Rosalie,” which sailed through the area in 1840, but was subsequently found drifting and derelict with her sails set and no crew on board.

Grisly 19th-century paintings show sailing vessels being devoured by monstrous weeds, and the area has featured in books by Jules Verne, among others.

But the mystery of the Sargasso is no longer much of a mystery. Surrounded by some of the strongest surface-water currents in the world, the “sea within a sea,” as it is known, is effectively cordoned off from the rest of the Atlantic.

This isolation gives the region its uncharacteristic temperature and surprising tranquility — causing wind-powered sail boats to come to an absolute standstill and creating all the ingredients for a nautical fairy tale.

The “Devil’s Sea”

The “Devil’s Sea,” also known as the “Dragon’s Triangle,” is a region in the Pacific roughly located around the Japanese island of Miyake, about 100 kilometers south of Tokyo.

Ancient legends tell of dragons that lived off the coast of Japan, bequeathing the region its nickname.

According to author Charles Berlitz, Japan lost five military vessels — as well 100 scientists studying the region — in the space of just two years between 1952 and 1954.

Like the Bermuda Triangle, the region was included in a 1972 article by naturalist and paranormal expert Ivan Sanderson, titled “The 12 Devil’s Graveyards Around the World.”

The “Vile Vortices,” as they are otherwise known, all occupy the same latitudes south and north of the equator and are said to be hotspots for peculiar physical anomalies and unexplained phenomena often attributed to electro-magnetic aberrations.

Sanderson hypothesized that hot and cold currents crossing these vortices might create electromagnetic disturbances affecting instruments and vessels, in turn causing ships’ disappearances.

However, while much mystery around the area may remain, American author and pilot Larry Kusche has long-since debunked many of the claims made by Berlitz and others.

Michigan Triangle

Lake Michigan, in the United States, has been the site of countless sightings of strange objects and phantom planes.

According to marine historian Dwight Bower in his book “Strange Adventures of the Great Lakes” the Michigan Triangle legend was born in 1937, when Captain George Donner unaccountably vanished from his freighter cabin during a routine coal delivery.

Having given strict instructions to be woken from his bed as the ship drew into port, Donner was nowhere to be found three hours later — despite his cabin door being locked from the inside.

Thirteen years later, Northwest Airlines Flight 2501 — carrying 55 passengers and three crew — left New York City for Minneapolis, only to seemingly evaporate from thin air as it passed over the Michigan Triangle.

The wreckage has never been discovered, despite being the subject of an annual search by the Michigan Shipwreck Research Associates, and investigations still continue in trying to explain the incident.

So, for sailors in search of a real close encounter, it could well be that Lake Michigan is, in fact, the best place for a creepy cruise.


Disclaimer: The authors’ views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of Bazzup. Data and charts, if used, in the article have been sourced from available information and have not been authenticated by any statutory authority. The author and Marine Insight do not claim it to be accurate nor accept any responsibility for the same. The views constitute only the opinions and do not constitute any guidelines or recommendation on any course of action to be followed by the reader.

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