Asia

The Taliban regime isn’t “inclusive” or “representative” of the Afghan people. : Union européenne

The EU's 27 member states have established five requirements for strengthening their involvement with the Taliban, including the development of a "inclusive and representative" transitional administration.

On Wednesday, an EU spokeswoman stated that the ‘caretaker’ Taliban administration in Afghanistan is not as inclusive as the Taliban had portrayed and promised.

“Based on first analysis of the names announced, it does not appear to be the inclusive and representative formation in terms of Afghanistan’s rich ethnic and religious variety that we wanted to see and that the Taliban had promised in recent weeks,” the EU spokeswoman told news agency AFP.

The EU’s 27 member states have established five requirements for strengthening their involvement with the Taliban, including the development of a “inclusive and representative” transitional administration.

According to AFP, an EU official stated that “such inclusion and representation is expected in the composition of a future transitional administration, as well as as a result of discussions.”

In Afghanistan, the Taliban has banned women’s sports, including cricket.

On Tuesday, the Taliban declared the formation of a hardline caretaker government with no women or non-Taliban members, as well as prominent leaders who are subject to UN sanctions or are wanted by the US on terrorism charges. They also have a $72 million bounty on their heads.

Foreign ministers from 20 countries, led by the US and German senior diplomats, will meet on Wednesday to discuss how to approach the Taliban’s new administration.

After the Taliban gained power in Afghanistan following the US-led departure of foreign forces, the West has been trying to figure out a route ahead.

Meanwhile, China has stated that it is eager to retain contact with the new Taliban administration in Afghanistan, citing its establishment as a “important milestone” in the country’s rehabilitation.

China would recognize the new administration, according to Wang Wenbin, a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry. The new government’s leaders were chosen on Tuesday. Members of the Taliban’s inner circle were appointed to top positions in Afghanistan’s new government, including the premiership of an ally of the Islamist Group’s founder and the interior ministership of a wanted man on a US terrorist list. On Wednesday, an EU spokeswoman stated that the ‘caretaker’ Taliban administration in Afghanistan is not as inclusive as the Taliban had portrayed and promised.

“Based on first analysis of the names announced, it does not appear to be the inclusive and representative formation in terms of Afghanistan’s rich ethnic and religious variety that we wanted to see and that the Taliban had promised in recent weeks,” the EU spokeswoman told news agency AFP.

The EU’s 27 member states have established five requirements for strengthening their involvement with the Taliban, including the development of a “inclusive and representative” transitional administration.

According to AFP, an EU official stated that “such inclusion and representation is expected in the composition of a future transitional administration, as well as as a result of discussions.”

In Afghanistan, the Taliban has banned women’s sports, including cricket.

On Tuesday, the Taliban declared the formation of a hardline caretaker government with no women or non-Taliban members, as well as prominent leaders who are subject to UN sanctions or are wanted by the US on terrorism charges. They also have a $72 million bounty on their heads.

Foreign ministers from 20 countries, led by the US and German senior diplomats, will meet on Wednesday to discuss how to approach the Taliban’s new administration.

After the Taliban gained power in Afghanistan following the US-led departure of foreign forces, the West has been trying to figure out a route ahead.

Meanwhile, China has stated that it is eager to retain contact with the new Taliban administration in Afghanistan, citing its establishment as a “important milestone” in the country’s rehabilitation.

China would recognize the new administration, according to Wang Wenbin, a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry. The new government’s leaders were chosen on Tuesday. Members of the Taliban’s inner circle were appointed to top positions in Afghanistan’s new government, including the premiership of an ally of the Islamist Group’s founder and the interior ministership of a wanted man on a US terrorist list.

ADVERTISMENT

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button