Education

The government has being sued over the poor quality of education that students in Bududa have received.

Based on enrolment, funds are distributed proportionally among schools. This means that smaller schools with fewer kids will receive less funding than larger schools with a larger enrollment,” according to the lawsuit.

The government has been sued for providing substandard educational opportunities to Bududa’s youngsters.

The suit, brought in the Equal Opportunities Tribunal by two lawyers, Najib Kasole and Abubaker Matanda, claims that the government has marginalized Bududu learners due to poor government funding in the region.

According to the complainants, the government’s method of disbursing capitation subsidies to schools has left those in Bududa in a terrible state due to the low number of students in the schools.

“A capitation grant is used by the government to distribute funding to schools participating in the UPE program. However, the grant’s allocation formula is unfair because it ignores the specific and distinctive needs of schools in the Bududa district.

Based on enrolment, funds are distributed proportionally among schools. This means that smaller schools with fewer kids will receive less funding than larger schools with a larger enrollment,” according to the lawsuit.

They further claim that because of the way funds are distributed, larger schools in Kampala and Wakiso with more students receive more money, while schools in hard-to-reach places such as Bududa, which frequently experience floods, receive less.

The complainants claim that low literacy rates in Bududa are due to a lack of money. According to them, this has resulted in low performance in national exams.

Despite the implementation of Universal Primary Education (UPE) in 1996, the complainants claim that literacy levels in Bududa remain low.

According to the lawsuit, “the Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS) report demonstrates the persistent discrepancy in literacy and numeracy levels across the country.” “While literacy and numeracy rates in Kampala and Wakiso districts were higher than the national average of 72 percent, Bududa district had one of the lowest literacy rates of less than 24 percent,” according to the research.

They argue that the government’s failure to provide quality education to Bududa’s children violates their right to education, as guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as well as their right to free and equal access to a good education, as guaranteed by Article 17 of the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights.

The plaintiffs want the court to require the Ministry of Education and Sports to adopt a national affirmative policy on UPE education, which would result in more money being allocated to the institutions.

They want the Equal Opportunities Commission to look into the district’s educational discrepancies, according to Kasole. He also wants the government to use affirmative action for teachers and schools in the region, according to him.

The Uganda National Examinations Board released the 2018 Primary Leaving Examinations and the Uganda Certificate of Education, and ministry of education officials stated they would investigate the poor performance of learners in the eastern area of the country.

Bududa had a failure rate of 18 percent that year, compared to a national failure average of 8.8 percent. The failure of candidates was attributed by UNEB to a lack of language skills, inability to grasp and interpret questions, and a lack of school laboratories where students could conduct practical science studies.

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