Education

Teachers say the new lower secondary curriculum is good but tough to implement.

Teachers have predicted that the new lower secondary curriculum will cost a lot of money to implement because it is heavily reliant on study materials.

Teachers have predicted that the new lower secondary curriculum will cost a lot of money to implement because it is heavily reliant on study materials.

Some of the teachers we spoke with stated that they require resources to be used in class so that students can conduct independent experiments and experiences while studying.

Before the Covid-19-induced lockdown in 2020, the government had rolled out a new lower secondary curriculum, and schools were closed just a few weeks into the school year.

This year’s start of classes also signals the start of the new curriculum. Teachers will need delivery abilities that are different from what kids are used to in this new curriculum.

Before the deployment, the National Curriculum Development Centre (NCDC) conducted teacher training of master trainers, which continued after the lockdown was lifted to ensure that instructors maintained the essential delivery abilities.

According to the NCDC, 60% of instructors have been taught so far, and empowerment will continue for the next ten years with refresher training.

Currently, the main focus is on assessment methodologies, with classroom work expected to account for 20% of final national exam results.

These trainings have benefitted them, according to George Ayoma, a chemistry teacher at Kololo Secondary School, and they all know what to do today.

He also praised the new curriculum, claiming that it will have a significant impact on kids.

Pius Kasirye, a retired head teacher, said the curriculum shift was long needed and that the new system will have a significant impact.

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