World News

Online interaction can impact mood, concentration of young people: study

eenagers' moods and cognitive performance can suffer as a result of being assessed online, according to a recent study done by the University of New South Wales (UNSW Sydney).

Online interaction can impact mood, concentration of young people: study

Sydney, Australia | BAZZUP | Teenagers’ moods and cognitive performance can suffer as a result of being assessed online, according to a recent study done by the University of New South Wales (UNSW Sydney).

In the study, which was released in the Scientific Reports journal in December 2022, 225 volunteers between the ages of 11 and 30 completed a learning task while being subjected to online social evaluation threat and a perceptually matched control condition.

Participants had to record an audio recording introducing themselves before beginning the activity. They were then informed that other people will listen to and review their audio samples online.

There was a “views and comments tracker” at the bottom of the screen while the online learning task was being completed. Participants were unaware of the recordings being viewed or remarked on, as well as whether the comments were kind or unfavorable, according to co-author and psychologist Susanne Schweizer of UNSW Sydney on Tuesday.

“This was to make it analogous to what it’s like in real life,” she continued. “When you have a work to complete, you can’t monitor what’s going online, but you know there will be a level of review.”

The study found that, compared to the control condition, all individuals experienced a higher rise in bad mood after the threat of social assessment, and that this threat also resulted in lower completion accuracy.

Young people’s time spent online has increased by 52% since the pandemic began, according to Schweizer.

“Our research revealed that young people’s ability to do a fundamental cognitive activity was hampered and that they felt distressed when they believed that others might be assessing them. These results are alarming if they accurately reflect the effects of online social evaluation, according to the expert.

Additionally, Schweizer pointed out that there are a lot of unanswered questions that need to be investigated further.

“We must go beyond the effects of online time alone. She said that further experimental work is needed to thoroughly examine the problem because it doesn’t appear to be capturing those unique differences, which are still unclear.

ADVERTISMENT

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button