Premier League

Tottenham’s choice to fire Antonio Conte as manager is explained by Daniel Levy.

Daniel Levy, the chairman of Tottenham Hotspur, has stated why he felt obligated to act and oust Antonio Conte as manager with 10 games left in the current campaign. Little over a week after his astonishing news conference meltdown, Tottenham has revealed that Antonio Conte has been fired as manager.

Daniel Levy, the chairman of Tottenham Hotspur, has stated why he felt obligated to act and oust Antonio Conte as manager with 10 games left in the current campaign. Little over a week after his astonishing news conference meltdown, Tottenham has revealed that Antonio Conte has been fired as manager.

After a 3-3 draw at Southampton, the Italian focused on his team and the atmosphere of the organization. Conte was always going to depart North London at the conclusion of the season, but chairman Daniel Levy quickly fired the 56-year-old after recognizing his untenability.

In a brief statement posted on the club website late Sunday evening, Levy explained why he felt compelled to part ways with Conte at this point in the season.

We still have 10 Premier League games left, and we’ll be fighting for a spot in the Champions League, according to Levy. We must all work together. To achieve the best result for our Club and great, devoted supporters, everyone must stand up.

Levy thought Spurs’ attempt to qualify for the Champions League would fail and that the team’s only option was to oust Conte before his term was up.

The Spurs update also made it official that Ryan Mason will serve as Cristian Stellini’s assistant for the remainder of the season. Given Mason’s position as temporary manager when Jose Mourinho was ousted in early 2021, the choice might come as a surprise.

In his final news conference, Conte said to a surprised crowd, “I see selfish players, I see guys who don’t want to support each other and don’t put their heart [in], I see only 11 players who play for themselves.” Conte’s words will go down in Premier League history.

“Why is it taking place? They are accustomed to it because it is commonplace here. They don’t compete for a significant prize, yes.

“They don’t want to play under stress or pressure,” the speaker said. This makes it simple.

After the draw at St. Mary’s, it was claimed that Conte had returned to Italy, which increased the degree of rumors about his future.

The possibility of Mauricio Pochettino, the former manager of Tottenham, succeeding him in the long run would undoubtedly be the subject of considerable conjecture.

But recently sacked Julian Nagelsmann might also be a serious contender. Levy, the club’s chairman, is expected to be evaluating candidates for the next permanent position even if achieving a top-four finish right now is the top priority.

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