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The KCCA begins evaluates the casual workers as their contract expire.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, a team of inspectors from the Directorate of Public Health inspected various locations in Kawempe division before travelling to Nakawa division on Thursday. According to Jude Byansi, KCCA's Waste and Sanitation Manager, the evaluation procedure, which was last conducted in 2017, will examine the workers' performance in terms of quality and quantity of work completed.

The Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) has begun evaluating the performance of casual workers in the five city divisions in preparation for contract renewal.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, a team of inspectors from the Directorate of Public Health inspected various locations in Kawempe division before travelling to Nakawa division on Thursday. According to Jude Byansi, KCCA’s Waste and Sanitation Manager, the evaluation procedure, which was last conducted in 2017, will examine the workers’ performance in terms of quality and quantity of work completed.

The procedure follows the expiration on September 15th, 2021 of KCCA’s contracts with community SACCOs in the five divisions to provide cleaning, landscaping, and engineering services. The emergence of 7 Hills, which began as a volunteer group in March 2021 only to begin hiring casual labor in order to acquire the same contract, poses a challenge to the SACCO members.

Aisha Nampeera, a single mother of three children, claims that her employment as a sweeper at KCCA is her only source of income. Nampeera describes how she has persevered through work hazards such as accidents in order to keep her employment and provide for her family.

She wants the KCCA to examine all workers’ performance and, if any are found to be underperforming, they should be dealt with individually rather than as a group.

Shamim Namukose, a widow with five children, is likewise concerned about her job loss and the closure of their SACCOs. She is worried that if the SACCOs’ contract isn’t renewed, they may be forced to close, leaving them without recourse to low-cost loans.

A garbage loader, Umar Kato, believes KCCA should evaluate the environment in which they perform. He claims that they are sometimes limited by inefficient equipment. He claims, for example, that they put off clearing up waste and silt drainage channels since the Kawempe division only has four garbage trucks.

John Atuhaire, who desilts drainage channels, has also petitioned KCCA to extend their contract, claiming that his position with the organization is his family’s main source of income. Atuhaire claims that they have endured difficult working conditions in order to make any money, however small, in order to support their families.

He stated how they sometimes desilt drainages without wearing the proper protective gear, such as gumboots, overalls, and gloves, putting themselves in danger. According to Atuhaire, the KCCA should interact with the casual laborers to better understand their problems and develop a solution that suits both parties.

In 2016, KCCA signed a two-year contract with community SACCOs. They continued to operate with KCCA after the contract expired in 2018, paying salaries directly to the workers’ bank accounts. They were given an 18-month contract in January 2020, which ended in June 2021.

On July 1, 2021, they received a two-and-a-half-month extension, which concluded on September 15, 2021. KCCA casual workers are hired under a reservation program that targets the elderly, particularly women, widows, HIV-positive women, and single moms. The majority of the members of the 7 Hills are young guys.

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